Yamaha Motor Company is one of the major two-wheeler manufacturers which is still working on self-balancing systems for motorcycles. In fact, the Japanese auto giant recently released a video showcasing its self-balancing tech called Advanced Motorcycle Stability Assist System (AMSAS), which is fitted to an electric Yamaha R3. The two-wheeler marque says that the technology assists in stabilising the vehicle’s posture at speeds of 5 kmph or less. Yamaha says that the system is still in the R&D stage, however, it will be further evolved in the future.

Yamaha says that the main aim behind developing AMSAS is to offer riders better control and peace of mind to riders, especially at lower speeds.

The system comes equipped with 6-axis Inertial Measurement Unit along with drive and steering actuators, which help achieves stabilisation at low speeds. In fact, Yamaha claims that the system is so versatile that the application does not require any major changes to be made to the frame of an existing model.

Yamaha says that the main aim behind developing AMSAS is to offer riders better control and peace of mind to riders, especially at lower speeds. The company feels that keeping motorcycles stable at low speeds requires a high level of riding skills, and AMSAS, which is equipped with control driving and steering functions, could assist in achieving better balance and stability. In fact, Yamaha has released a video of the bike showing a rider on the seat, moving along slowly with no hands on the controls while the electronics do their thing.

Yamaha has released a video of the bike showing a rider on the seat, moving along slowly with no hands on the controls while the electronics do their thing.

Now, experienced riders might feel the technology is somewhat redundant, however, newer riders might appreciate this additional safety net. And that is Yamaha’s angel as well. The company says that 70 per cent of bike crashes happen within two seconds after the initial moment of cause, which it feels is not enough time for some riders to avoid a crash. Yamaha says, in these kinds of situations, instead of solely relying on user decision and skill to perform the right evasive manoeuvres, such rider-assistive technologies will be of much better help.

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